Chautauqua Lake Management Actions Explained

By Douglas E. Conroe

This letter to the editor was written in response to an editorial published in The Post-Journal on October 10, 2020, titled “Strong Leadership Needed On Lake; Is That A Pipe Dream?” It was submitted to The Post-Journal two weeks ago but, as of this date, has not been printed.

Editor, The Post-Journal:

This is to comment upon and also to correct inaccuracies contained in the daily Editorial of the October 10-11, 2020, edition of The Post-Journal.  The editorial reflected upon Chautauqua Lake management.

The editor leaves the reader with the impression that the Chautauqua Lake Association sponsored Racine-Johnson study was performed to evaluate the 2019 herbicide program that occurred in the lake. That was not the purpose of the study.  The study was a continuation of aquatic plant monitoring that has occurred annually by the principal owner of Racine-Johnson since beginning in 2002.  The work started initially under the auspices of Cornell University and then upon his retirement from Cornell transitioned to the ecologist’s subsequent involvement as the principal in Racine-Johnson Aquatic Ecologists.  Comments rendered about perceived impacts of the herbicide program were simply observations resulting from the ecologist’s seventeen years of involvement with lake conditions here and at other lakes, comments the nature of which he normally renders from time-to-time.  Although the Department of Environmental Conservation has involved his expertise in evaluating herbicide treatments elsewhere, that was not his role here.  His role here has been to record and explain the lake’s aquatic plant community’s presence as an aspect of normal scientific benchmarking and to perform additional lake studies as requested at times.  His staff is currently also monitoring the herbivore community and its impact on plant growth, mussel presence in the lake and the staff is being vigilant for new invasive species that might arrive.

The editor further leaves the reader with the impression that the third party herbicide evaluation was performed under the sponsorship of Chautauqua County.  In reality, the evaluation was performed under the sponsorship of the Chautauqua Lake and Watershed Management Alliance.  The Alliance determined the scope of the work, retained the contractor, met privately with the contractor to discuss its report prior to the report’s publication (an aspect that the CLA does not do with Racine-Johnson in order to assure the contractor’s independence) and paid for the report.

The two reports should not be compared in a one-versus-the-other scenario.  They evaluated different time frames and for the most part different lake locations.  The reports did exhibit similarities in that both noted apparent herbicide drift to non-target areas and that damage occurred to native plant species as well as non-native species.  Nevertheless, the studies were not performed on a common platform from which a valid comparison can be drawn.  The two reports served different purposes.

Regrettably, the Alliance sponsored third party study was hurriedly scoped at the last minute and reduced in scope due to budget limitations.  The study varied from standard evaluation timeframes and parameters.  Nevertheless, it gave a glimpse into what happened.

The editor also attributes the current problem to the state of affairs post-County Executive Borrello.  A wider view of the situation needs to occur.  Actually, the current predicament started back in 2017 when the then county administration refused to update its 1990 supplemental environmental impact statement.  It justified such by saying that it would be inappropriate to develop the statement because the county would not be the herbicide permit holder.  Officials did not disclose that when the 1990 statement was prepared and issued that the county was not the permit holder then either.  Nevertheless, in 1990 the county became the mediator between all sides, involved all sides along with the general community in the statement’s preparation and produced a document that was workable to all sides.

Unfortunately, by not updating its environmental impact statement county officials knowingly opened the door widely for the one-sided document that was developed that continues to be controversial through today.  The Town of Ellery allowed the Chautauqua Lake Partnership to dictate the content of the document utilizing the guidance of the partnership’s attorneys and herbicide vendor.  The other parties that the county brought to the table in 1990 were excluded from the document’s preparation and were brushed aside when they offered over 300 comments at the end of the various processes where public input was required by state law.  Had county officials, most of which are still in office, stepped up to the plate in 2017, the situation today might be totally different.

To many the 2019 county-authored Memorandum of Agreement presented a current day path to compromise.  Those that work with it know differently.  It was a political splash one-sided edict tying funding to signing.  The better hope for success was a two months earlier issued Conservation Statement that was jointly prepared and signed by ten organizations.  County officials declined to work with those groups and pushed ahead on their own path.  We now have the state of affairs that has resulted.  County officials need to learn from this and the 1990 process if real improvement is to occur.

Douglas E. Conroe
Executive Director
Chautauqua Lake Association, Inc.
429 East Terrace Avenue, Lakewood, NY 14750
Phone (716) 763-8602
www.chautauqualakeassociation.org

Waterkeeper Alliance Welcomes Chautauqua-Conewango Consortium

New Affiliate to Protect Local Water

The world’s largest and fastest growing nonprofit solely focused on clean water, the Waterkeeper Alliance, has welcomed the Chautauqua-Conewango Consortium as a new Waterkeeper Affiliate.

In its role of fighting for clean water worldwide, the Waterkeeper Alliance connects and mobilizes over 300 Waterkeeper groups. As chair of the Chautauqua-Conewango Consortium, local resident and educator Melanie Smith will lead the group’s work to protect and preserve the entirety of the Conewango Creek watershed by combining firsthand knowledge of the waterway with an unwavering commitment to the community’s rights to clean water and environmental justice. 

“The Chautauqua-Conewango Consortium will have an incredibly important job,” said Marc Yaggi, Executive Director of Waterkeeper Alliance. “Waterkeeper Affiliates defend their communities against anyone who threatens their right to clean water, from law-breaking polluters to irresponsible government officials. Until our public agencies have the means necessary to protect us from polluters, and the will to enforce the law, there will always be a great need for people like the Consortium to fight for our right to clean water.” 

The Chautauqua-Conewango Consortium will be an advocate for Conewango Creek, its lakes and its tributaries, working to protect and restore water quality through community action and enforcement. Smith, chair of the group, stated: “Our Waterkeeper Affiliate’s aim is to provide strong advocacy that will result in clean water for all citizens, whether they rely on it for drinking or recreation and to maintain the ecological integrity of the waterways within the Conewango Creek watershed.”

The Chautauqua-Conewango Consortium is sponsored by the Conewango Creek Watershed Association. The Consortium will work on water-related issues affecting the water bodies included in the Conewango Creek watershed.  Those water bodies include Chautauqua, Cassadaga and Bear Lakes, the Chadakoin River, and Cassadaga Creek in New York, as well as all of the headwaters and the main stem of Conewango Creek. A main goal of the Consortium is to be the voice of protection for the region’s water, both surface and ground, and the creatures who depend on it. This will be achieved utilizing research-based materials which will guarantee factual information to the public. The Consortium will also provide a means for the public to report citizen science or improper practices. Visit the Consortium’s website at cccwaters.org for more information and to learn how to get involved.

Waterkeeper Alliance is a global movement uniting Waterkeeper Organizations and Affiliates around the world, focusing citizen action on issues that affect our waterways, from pollution to climate change. Waterkeepers patrol and protect over 2.5 million square miles of rivers, lakes and coastlines in the Americas, Europe, Australia, Asia, and Africa. For more information about the global organization please visit: www.waterkeeper.org

3 Million Pounds of Aquatic Vegetation Harvested from Chautauqua Lake

And the Work is Just Getting Started

Lakewood, NY — The past two months have been productive for the Chautauqua Lake Association, and the work is just getting started. July is expected to be even more productive with the expansion to a third site to efficiently maintain Chautauqua Lake’s ecology.

To date this season, the Lakewood and Long Point crews have removed 183 truck loads of aquatic vegetation from Chautauqua Lake, totaling more than 3 million pounds. Last week alone the CLA crews removed 500,00 pounds of vegetation from the lake. Starting their summer season two weeks early this year, the Long Point crew worked from the Village Casino along Lakeside Drive, moving south towards the Phillips Mills/Colburn area, and the Lakewood crew completed the area from Greenhurst to Fluvanna, then moved on towards Celoron. Other areas harvested throughout June by the CLA include Ashville Bay, Stow, Shore Acres, Burtis Bay, and the southern basin.

In addition to weed management, the CLA shoreline crews have assisted lakefront owners with the burden of cleaning their properties and offering weed disposal services. The shoreline crews started off June clearing woody debris from Chautauqua Lake and worked their way up the east side of the lake through Ashville Bay and Lakewood. 

“The May and June work has been extremely productive,” said Douglas Conroe, CLA executive director. “We have been able to open areas for people which have not been able to be opened before (such as canals) because we started earlier this year, but July is going to be a major operation.”

This year, CLA crews operating out of Mayville, Long Point and Lakewood will work in a circular route within the north and south basins throughout the duration of the summer. Implementing this new strategy will increase the efficiency and overall impact of the CLA lake maintenance program. 

Each week a new work plan is published on the CLA website which includes a map outlining the anticipated route and location for each of the crews. To preview the weekly work plan, maps and updated work reports, please visit ChautauquaLakeAssociation.org or @ChautauquaLakeAssociation on Facebook.